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Below are the 20 most recent journal entries recorded in cuse3421's LiveJournal:

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Saturday, June 30th, 2007
12:21 am
I love how the LiveJournal is in EST, it's June 29 here but I'm posting in the future - amazing. Unfortunately I can't post in past... maybe I wouldn't be scrambling to get three posts within a month (like I constantly promise) for the first time this year (ugh - I've been writing a lot, just not all within in the Cuse3421 LiveJournal). In order for this to be the most efficient day in the history of the Cuse3421, it'll have to breakdown like this. One post with a good ol' fashioned rant. One post with a recent piece by moi from my most recent writing position with The Albuquerque Tribune. One post with some links to great pieces to check out. Time to start up like Mick Jagger in the 60s.

--
Albuquerque, N.M. is an 8-hour flight with two layovers away from Avoca, Pa. which is another 45 minutes away from Archbald, Pa. It's a little odd to live so disconnected to home for such a long time (if you can call the 2 to 3 months of summer long), but it's an experience I may soon need to get used to. I've got one year left of college and no idea where life takes me afterwards. It could be in Pennsylvania, it could be in New York. Then again it could be in Albuquerque, Vegas or Seattle or Bismarck, Pierre or Cheyenne. Whatever happens it'll be exciting. I'll meet new people, find new forms of entertainment, and still get the opportunity to visit home. A place which may or may not ever house all of my family and friends ever again...

That's a depressing thought, but one development from Albuquerque makes me realize I will be able to adjust, cope and thrive whatever happens a year from now. Check my cell phone bill because that's where it is. I'm not on a splendid new family plan saving tons of dough (though I might be, I haven't checked in awhile). I'm making more calls of more than 2 minutes with my male friends and it's a fantastic, adult-like thing.

Prior to this summer, the overwhelming majority of my conversations with an overwhelming majority of my male friends consisted of this:
"Hey,"
"Hey,"
"What's going on?"
"Nothing, how about yourself?"
"Nothing, what are you up to tonight?"
(Another 30 to 45 seconds of conversation)

There's nothing wrong with these conversations. They lead to face-to-face get togethers and much longer male-to-male conversations in person, which I value a lot more than any electronic form of conversation. However, the opportunity to have face-to-face conversation with my friends is becoming more and more and more rare. And even if this new development is a forced result of upcoming new situations, it's kind of fun. Talking to family on the phone is yesterday's pogs - you always have room for them even if it's in your closet to be visited once every other month. This friends on the phone stuff is all the rage.

I like walking around aimlessly within my tiny room while asking how all the friends I'm not quite on the "I'll phone you from Albuquerque," level are doing. I catch myself smiling in the mirror when throwing all the regular insults back and forth at whomever I'm talking with just like we were sitting at Dunkin' Donuts in Dickson City the night before. I revel in those brief moments where the conversations briefly turn towards the future and two men engage philosophically in topics we never had to truly consider (until we came into a situation where we needed to talk for over two minutes via phone that is). Maybe this is the phone livelihood I was missing out on by being a socially awkward, mostly single male between the ages of 14 and 21. It's kind of cool.

Today I'll keep enjoying the once every couple of weeks style conversations I'm having with my friends from home and school. Tomorrow I hope to keep the new tradition going and not let the frequency of these small moments of home euphoria get less and less. And the day after that, I'll probably go back to sub consciously worrying about the future, but I'll feel a little bit better about one facet of the game of Life. Wherever I end up, as long as it has cell phone reception, I'll finally be confident in my ability to keep in touch with both my family AND my friends.
--

Mmmmm...posty goodness. Check back in July for some legitimate tri-post experiences, but until then feel free to check out my work from The Trib and some solid links from this past week. I'd share more with you but 8 a.m. comes early here (even if it's two hours later than 8 a.m. EST)c and I must be off to bed. Until next time, keep your cell phones on, put my number in it and dial-in to the sounds of Joan Jett and the Blackhearts.

Current Mood: tired
12:11 am
Check back later for a more in-depth analysis of Albuquerque, NM
If I haven't already, I know I'll inevitably be answering the "So how's Albuquerque," (or some alternative) question for everyone I know and encounter within the next two to three months. So far I've responded with a compact, "The scenery is beautiful, the weather is gorgeous, the city has lots to do because it's a college town and work is very relaxed." I think that hits the main points of interest with a solid adjective or description for each, but I know I like to explore beyond my favorite descriptive part of speech. If you're interested in a more realistic and tangible feel for Albuquerque, let me introduce you to my first impression:

http://blogs.scripps.com/albq/intern/2007/06/day_one_in_albuquerque_set_the.html
Nathan Mattise, for The Albuquerque Tribune, 10 June 2006

Day One in Albuquerque.

I’ve never been further west than Ohio so (by some unwritten new journalism blogging laws) I’m obligated to document my first day in Albuquerque. And as an added bonus, I’ll share some insight on life with my Aunt Kathie. She’s a volunteer with the Maxwell Anthropology Museum at UNM and I won’t reveal her age in case she ever stumbles upon this blog. Let’s just say she’s quirky and can be described with my favorite adjective (hint: it starts with an “o” and rhymes with cloctogenerian).


Friday, June 8
2 p.m. - Albuquerque Airport: After sleeping through eight hours of flight, I finally arrived. The airport is gorgeous and literally the first sound I hear is a mariachi band finishing up its set near the parking garage. I picked up my bags and a smiling Aunt Kathie greets me… with a copy of the Albuquerque Journal in hand. Two things strike me about this: 1) Regardless of the conversations we had on this topic leading up to my arrival, Aunt Kathie still thinks I’m an intern at the Albuquerque Journal and 2) I realize I’m a journalism student, but I’ll take a hug or a “Hello, good to see you. How are you?” before a “Here’s the paper.”
I like newspapers but I have other needs.

(Note: After we ate lunch back at her place I ended up reading the Journal. My thoughts: The bubonic plague still exists? I’m obviously very naive in this instance, but I thought that became extinct in the fifteenth century. Also, it's awesome that the local government is encouraging street performers. Up in Syracuse, N.Y. everyone acts like complete jerks to the guys busting their butts playing acoustic guitars or saxophones outside the local Starbucks, but they’re actually really talented musicians. At the magazine I work for we did a profile on Eli Harris, the most famed street musician near the SU campus, and the next semester the music industry students’ record label produced his CD. Coincidence? I think not. Just good journalism.)


4:30p.m.ish – The open space behind Aunt Kathie’s house: Before coming out here, my family often joked that Aunt Kathie would take me mountain climbing, skydiving, white-water rafting and various other adventure activities they deemed strange for a person of her age. Well, as soon as I unpacked my suitcase, we hit the hiking trails leading up to the Sandias. Aside from the fact that I didn’t put on my sunscreen, it was really enjoyable. The way this area puts an emphasis on maintaining its natural beauty is incredibly admirable, and Aunt Kathie never forgets to point that out. By the time I leave in a few months I might achieve amateur botanist status. The only other noteworthy thing from this experience is the fact that my adrenaline let me jump at least 3 feet when I saw a rattlesnake cross the trail.
(Aunt Kathie giggled and just kept walking like nothing unusual happened).

7 p.m. sharp – Aunt Kathie’s patio (a.k.a. “Kathie’s Café”): Dinner every night is at the same time. Dinner every night is outside. Dinner every night includes a glass of white wine (“Three-buck Chuck” Chardonnay from Trader Joe’s is the official drink of Kathie’s Café). Dinner every night lasts about an hour and a half. At least I assumed all this based on night one.

I will say it was nice to have this relaxed, conversation-driven meal experience. Back home it’s always reheating dinner in the microwave and rushing out the door to work, practice, nightlife, etc. I never had a real home-dining experience until I had Aunt Kathie’s interpretation of Aunt Lori’s chicken while watching the sun set over Mount Taylor. I could get used to it - even if the conversation part is mostly one-sided. Aunt Kathie has so many stories to share and it’s obvious that she really appreciates having someone to listen to them.

11:45 p.m. – Aunt Kathie’s living room: The living room is the only room in the house with cable, so I decided that following dinner I’d watch some TV (especially because Friday night means "What Not to Wear" and "Take Home Chef" on TLC).
I was just enjoying a re-run of the bridal gown "What Not to Wear" episode when I was startled by a shriek. It’s Aunt Kathie. Nothing is wrong. However, she informs me that she has trouble sleeping. OK, no big deal… except this means she’d like me to get out of the living room before 11:30 p.m. every night.
If you or someone you know is a college kid, you know how ridiculous this request is. (I would later find out that this didn’t mean I had to be in the house every night by 11:30 though, so I’ll still find some entertainment. It just won’t come from my beloved trashy reality shows).

Bedtime – the guest bedroom: Mmmm… sleep. My first impression of everything is that the area is gorgeous and offers so many different enjoyable experiences. My living conditions make my stay here particularly interesting, but it seems like the relationship Aunt Kathie and I will develop is the stuff coming-of-age novels are made of ("Tuesdays with Kathie," anyone?). I took one last stroll on the patio trying to fathom what the next few months will look like, and I had no idea. I have no idea what my work experience will be. I have no idea what people I will meet. I have no idea if Aunt Kathie will become a philosophical mentor to me or if she’ll just drive me crazy. It’s the first time in awhile I have no idea what’s going on around me, and it’s a good feeling.

Note: This post written on Saturday during a ridiculous pseudo-storm. However, Aunt Kathie wouldn’t let me use the one Ethernet outlet she had due to a fear of lightning affecting the computer. Needless to say, I went out and grabbed a wireless router early Sunday and it’s now installed :)

Current Mood: calm
12:08 am
As if you haven't had enough readinglicious content today...
If you're in the market for some eye candy, check out the 16-year-old who plays Nancy Drew or feast on some of my recent fav links.



- For all of us sexually frustrated in our early 20s, Kate McGovern sympathizes (from NYT.com, registration is free):
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/24/fashion/24love.html?ex=1183521600&en=eb6f13fe5a1e449b&ei=5070

- If you like the NBA, please let me turn you on to my favorite sports' columnist, Bill Simmons. This is his most recent post, an annual running diary of the NBA Draft. Enjoy, just don't let the Notorious S.A.S. run it for you:
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=simmons/070629

- This summer I'm at The Albuquerue Tribune. Last summer I was at The Pocono Record. If those experience switched places, I could have been covering this hot lead:
http://www.poconorecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070627/NEWS/706270339

- I'm currently reading the book, "Me Talk Pretty One Day," by David Sedaris for two reasons. First, I'm obsessed with This American Life and he's a regular contributing storyteller, and secondly, it comes with high recommendations from people whose literary expertise I trust. That said, here's his latest piece that ran in The New Yorker:
http://web.lexis-nexis.com.libezproxy2.syr.edu/universe/document?_m=df05818038f15a130dc39bcc4f531007&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLzVzz-zSkVb&_md5=b90d402834c9b7aee894463c292448f5
*(if the link doesn't work, e-mail me or leave a comment and I'll send you the article directly. I had to Nexus it because The New Yorker doesn't have a complete online archive)

- Finally, I'm pretty sure web sites like this are only useful to the iPhone generation: http://www.techcrunch.com/2007/06/27/when-youve-got-to-go-go-to-mizpeecom/

Current Mood: accomplished
Thursday, May 31st, 2007
5:23 pm
At least I didn't leave it at two posts like in April...
I'm going to Albuquerque soon. I swear with all the inevitable free time on my hands, there will be three, THREE, posts per month. Until then, this is all I have to offer. Let's kick this rant...

--
Think about this for a second. Less than two weeks ago I left my junior year of college behind. Indirectly, this means one thing. I'm a senior. I have less than 12 months to figure out what comes next, and I don't have a goddamn clue. This is a question that will probably seep into all of my thoughts, emotions and expressions over the course of the next year, but that itself is not what's incredibly scary to me at this moment. It's a companion realization of Seniorhood that has me spooked a bit, and I don't know if even Scooby and Shaggy could help me sort it out (I've watched at least 5 made for TV Scooby-Doo movies on Cartoon Network this summer, forgive me).

Like I said, I'm going to Albuquerque, NM on June 8. That's roughly a week away. After that, the next time I know I'll be home in Scranton, Pa. is from Aug. 3 to Aug. 12 (nine days). After that, I know I'll be home for Winter Break during the academic year (roughly another three weeks). After that...? Do I only have 30 days left of my life in Scranton, Pa?

Sure it seems this may be over-dramatic, and in all likelihood it is. However, it's frighteningly possible that my time at home is over. I'll never have an extended stay of waking up to Dora the Explorer and breakfast with my little sister. I'll never have the opportunity to play tennis for 3 hours at night followed by $1.50 ice cream cones at least twice a week. I might never consistently see my grandparents, my family, my friends from home, the places I hang out, the people I enjoy catching up with, all of it - it could realistically be behind me for good. Sure change is good, and if you're not constantly evolving you're devolving, but goddamn, no one wants to leave everything behind.

Maybe it's not right to think of it as leaving everything behind. That wasn't the mindset I took when going to college, though when going to college everyone always still came back. I still keep in touch with a lot of the same people I did four years ago. I still occasionally do the same things I did four years ago. Hell I even look the same as I did four years ago, take a look at the 2004 VVHS Yearbook for evidence. So will everything change when May 2008 comes? No. But I have a sinking feeling more will change in May 2008 than in May 2004, and in the early stages of this realization, I think it's OK to be a bit spooked.
--

So not the cleanest thing I ever wrote, but what can you do? It's an over-saturated with thought type of feeling I have during my last days in the valley for summer '07. I'll probably spend the rest of them doing what I do best, watching lots of tv, reading, listening to music, working out and drinking mad amounts of chai. It'll be enjoyable. So in order to maximize my amount of NEPA-living, I'm out. Enjoy the summer of '07 if you don't see me while in Albuquerque. Remember to live it up, wear sunscreen and continue to listen to the genre-pushing tunes of the Harlem Shakes.

Current Mood: bored
Monday, April 30th, 2007
11:24 pm
Well, at least I got to two posts this month...
Balls!



(How's that for an attention grabber?)

*Note* The Editorial staff removed previous words used to jump start this post due to fear of FCC repercussions

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the laughable piece of literature known as the Cuse3421 LiveJournal. It's always a pleasure to have you, and it's even more of a pleasure to be providing the literary philosophical nonsense for the evening. Before I write so much that you realize I'm lame before the featured rant, here she goes again:
--

Spring is finally here - at least I assume that when it's this warm in Syracuse, NY, everyone in the world must be enjoying some comfortable weather. The seasonal change causes plenty of good things to emerge with it - the sun, grass, baseball and the end of the academic semester :) However, there is one emergence where I'm uncertain whether it's simple correlation or causation: the rapid increase in the amount of attractive human beings. (I'm sorry that last sentence wasn't attractive, but I've lost the virtues of word choice and sentence structure during an ECN paper this evening).

For me, the increase in attractive beings is most notable in observations of females. It could be my own inexperience, naivety, shyness, etc. - but in the spring I find myself falling victim to the Joel factor far more often than in the fall. The Joel factor, for those unfamiliar with the film "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind," is best encompassed in a direct quote from the film's main character(done from memory):

"Why is it that I fall in love with any women who shows the slightest bit of interest in me?"

Now to clarify. I don't fall in love with any women who shows the slightest bit of interest in me. When it's nice outside and I encounter a girl I don't interact with often or I meet for the first time, I find myself saying things like, "Wow, she's really cute," or "I'd love to hang out with this girl." This, my interpretation of the Joel factor, happens far more often in the spring than it does during other seasons based on my experiences (Make sense? No? Great, this is going to be a fantastic post).

If you'll operate with me under the assumption that this occurrence is true, it's logical to think about, "What makes it happen?" The main argument I came up with for it (which I thought of during the time it took me to find that squishball picture) involves the end of the academic semester and the inevitable departure from a community you've spent the past 4 to 5 months in. It's the same argument that may cause an increase in hook-ups for graduating seniors (which I've observed and upon request I can share through anecdotes). Basically, a sense of urgency that you won't be around much longer causes you to seek out companionship in places you previously wouldn't. It's not as simple as seeing someone you weren't attracted to in October and all of a sudden they've grown on you in April, but if you've been alone for 8 months and you only have one month left in a location - you'll be more inclined to widen your perceptions of who you'd like to be with. It's life's little joke. You're inevitably going to stumble across people you perceive you'd be happy with because you only have a limited amount of time to be with them.

So is there any remedy to this if it's true? Well, um... tough question. I'd like to think that perhaps you should live each day with the uncertainty of the next. That you should never be afraid to take a risk, meet someone you have even the smallest inkling of interest in, and investigate that potential a little more. However, this doesn't really happen. We live in a time of our lives when we're young, there's no rush to find companionship, and eventually the magic love fairy will drop you in the lap of someone appropriate. So in that reality, when the girl / guy comes along that's not quite perfect (they don't have the right style, they have the wrong friends, they live in the wrong area), you simply ignore him or her and keep on waiting to meet Mr. or Mrs. Right. But the more I encounter the end of the school year, the more I realize school and life are eerily similar. When Spring comes around and my time is limited until leaving for summer, I'm willing to open myself up to relationship-chemistry experiments with more people. Well just like I won't be in college forever, I'll only be young for so long and maybe it's time I apply the Joel effect to all the seasons before my youth graduates.

--
By the end of all that, I think I might have said something I meant to. It might have even been slightly insightful, who knows? The constant stream-of-conscientious stuff or the self-deprecation probably doesn't make it an easier read, but it gives it the appearance of being snarky at least. Anyway, an enthralling "Pimp My Ride," marathon is on and since I can't resist MTV original programming, I need to answer that call. Until next time folks, good luck with finals and enjoy the end of spring semester. When you're driving all your stuff home to Mom, make sure you roll up to that first hometown stop sign blasting the tunes of Margot and the Nuclear So-So's...

Current Mood: tired
Friday, April 27th, 2007
11:06 pm
I just finished Franny and Zooey - if Salinger can't inspire you to write, you're hopeless...
Evening folks. Nothing says "I have a life, really I do," quite like posting some really spacey thoughts in your LiveJournal on a Friday night. End of the semester / beginning of spring always strikes me as a time of enlightened and clear thought. Maybe there's something to the realization that your life is about to alter to some degree, whether it's just going home leaving one life (college - all those friends and all those perceptions of self) for another (home - your past, what made you into the person who was able to come to college and find him/herself), that simply just makes you reflect better. Whatever it is, this Feist CD I have going on is the perfect backdrop and it's about time to hit a rant (or two). Shall we?

--
I've seen plenty of movies about how a life can be drastically altered through the classroom: Dangerous Minds, Dead Poets Society, Breakfast Club (ok - that's detention and self-discovery, but you get the point). Still, I've been going to school since I was 5 or 6 and never had that experience. That's not to say I haven't had memorable classroom experiences (a quirky teacher here, one you have a crush on as a youth [or as a highschooler], someone who just really challenges you), but there's a significant difference between a memorable class experience, a productive ("Yay! I learned my times tables,") class experience and a MEANINGFUL one.

I've only got two full semesters left of my education (pending something unforeseen, which is totally feasible). Thank god I finally got my meaningful class at the ripe age of 21 in the second semester of my junior year of college.

The class is a public advocacy class. I took it to fufill a requirement in the honors college curriculum that I may or may not finish in the end. I thought public advocacy meant we'd be talking about lobbying groups or activist causes, but it really meant a communications theory class. I thought communications theory meant messenger-receiver models and Aristotle's trio of logos, pathos and ethos - but it really meant an outlook on life.

The professor for the class is an absolute character. Dr. R is a large (in the sense that he could have been a football player), jolly man with a thick Caribbean accent and a love for laughing and the occasional joke. He writes on the board in script that might as well be French, German or any romance language that's not English. He loves to drink 12 oz. bottles of Tropicana juice that disappear in his huge hands, and he's the best read prof. (in terms of what's happening in the news) that I've ever met, including the Newhousians. In short, he's the world's only genius who will never flat out tell you one single piece of information that amazes you. What Michael Jordan is to basketball, Shakespeare to literature and Paris Hilton to "trashy yet semi-intriguing", Dr. R is to common sense and the ability to convey abstract concepts to folks so they can understand.

I didn't know I was in the presence of greatness at the beginning of the semester, and I'm pretty sure none of my classmates did either. But I bet Dr. R, though he'd never admit it, knew exactly how things were going to play out. That he was going to transform the way 12-15 young people approached life, and not even come off a bit cocky or impressive during it. He knew he was leading a room of greatness even before we knew we were great.

It's hard to explain what this class does, but that won't stop me from making a failed attempt. I'll toss out some terms that will mean nothing to anyone, but we really embraced them in class. Vulnerability. Ambiguity. Profound truths. Mindfullness. Moral development. I'm still unsure whether or not I truly embody or understand any of these, but I think I can at least explain the actions in class and let you (the reader) make connections yourself.

The class challenged each of us to wrap our minds around the idea that nothing is definite - most notably, even yourself. Each and every one of us knows less about ourselves than we could ever imagine, and since we're clueless on "me," there's no way we can really communicate with others and truly know them. With that realization, we embarked on a journey to develop this "moral development," so we could become truly aware of ourselves so we could attempt to know others. The class became about realizing that we need to experience ourselves in the deepest, scariest, most intense and personal way we could ever imagine. And only then, would we be able to encounter others and realize how great each little everyday action and feeling is, just how much strength it takes to express them, to experience them, to supress some and to share others. It became a whole new way of looking at the world and experiencing it.

In that class, I never met anyone of classmates before. Yet now, I've heard people reveal stories of overcoming a parent's alcoholism, a boyfriend's drug problems, a sister's body image or even their own fear of loneliness and the battle with substance that accompanied it. I'd hear stories of dealing with a lump in your breast, what it's like to hear someone use the word "ghetto" and have it strike an all too personal chord, or how trying it is to worry about a friend in light of one of life's most recent and horrible tragedies. We had stories of dealing with race, dealing with ethnicity, dealing with sexuality (even if it's presumed and not authentic) and stories about dealing with a tree-hugger persona. Relationships were found to be only good on the surface, or at least there was fear of what comes next, and yet others were open about their struggles to know what comes first. My classmates heard me talk about wearing my clothes backwards like Kris Kross at first, but soon I realized the impact this class was having on others. I was a late bloomer, but I still managed to get out stories about coping with my grandmother's death and my struggle with religion in the face of sexuality and politics.

My class ends on Tuesday. The last day everyone is supposed to give a speech that lasts no more than five minutes with the theme of "share the best piece of advice you've ever heard." I never really knew why I was attracted to these quotes (ok, that's a lie - I liked them because they were pop-culture born and they kinda' fit into the "constant evolution" idea I buy into), but I'm going with either of the following:

"There's nothing worse than being ordinary."
"I'd rather people hate us for changing than for being the same."

With a new perspective on the world that constantly forces me to analyze, to understand even with the realization I never can fully understand; I'm not sure that I can ever be the same for more than a moment. That's a philosophy on life I have a hard time calling ordinary.




(Can you guess which quote comes from which?)

--
So - um, nice weather we're having... It's amazing how time flies when you have an idea in your head and you're just compelled by it. I literally started writing and realized I stopped 50 minutes later. Oh well, it's like a game of Mouse Trap. Took forever to set-up but you're lucky if the game lasts 30 seconds (and even luckier if more than two people ever play it). On that realization, it's time to play some N64 Jeopardy with residents like a good RA should. Until we meet again folks, keep your minds sharp and your ears honed in on the synthy goodness of Daft Punk.

Current Mood: curious
Saturday, March 31st, 2007
9:53 pm
This whole three times a month thing...um, it'll be back in April
Evening madams and missuers (sp?). Here slacking as always we have the Cuse3431 LiveJournal, and it's a pleasure to finally update again. In the next few months the updates will back to the normal three per calendar page (1. Because I miss writing in an open forum where anything is possible and 2. Because I'll simply have more time on my hands when this semester slows towards an end). To pseudo-make up for the lack of content, I'm going to toss at least two good rants into this (I'll even conveniently number them) and then a site format change to boot - deal? Good, let's dance shall we...

--
Rant#1

I'm a junior in college and recently I realized that up to this point in my life I've avoided a very harsh question of self-realization. If you ever sat yourself down to ponder, "am I really good enough," you know what I'm talking about.

Everyone does this in life after experiencing a setback from what I'll refer to as "petty" things - the rejection from the individual your sexually attracted to, the sports team you were cut from, the part in the play you just weren't right for. Those moments are all scary in their own right, but eventually they can be overcome. The true terror of "am I good enough" comes when the real world starts knocking on your door and you need to make life-altering decisions in a matter of weeks (i.e. find a job, a grad school, something) only to find that your options aren't as plentiful as you once thought.

Not to brag, but based on my past, I have no reason to think I shouldn't be good enough. I've always done well in school, performed above my capabilities in extracurriculars, been incredibly people-oriented; hell I've even consistently dated people far more physically attractive than me (not that this last trait matters in the conversation, but let it be known I'm an overachiever). Maybe my string of successes is what makes asking the "am I good enough," so hard. But when I spent my fall and early spring semester sending out nearly 20 applications to potential places of internship and only one place wanted to give me a chance, the question hit me like a ton of bricks. Shouldn't the kid with the 3.8, at the journalism school, with the diverse extracurriculars, the gawdy recommendations, the past experiences and some perceived ability be able to get in at The Scranton Times for christ sake? It's The Scranton Times - isn't that just a step above The Weekly Reader and a Sure Fine Brochure?

It's too early to pick out the silver lining in this cloud and discover what life lesson is burried deep within this frustration. Maybe one day I'll look back and say adversity may me stronger, doubt made me work harder, the will to avoid conformity paid off in the long run, etc. At the moment though, I'm going to sit and ponder if I'm good enough. If I'll get the chance to say "I told you so," to those who politely declined with nothing more than a note that says sorry. I'll be spending my summer in Albuquerque, N.M. It'll be a new experience, a new way of life, and maybe a new answer to the age worry of "am I...

--
Rant #2

I love pop culture. I read blogs (blogs.usatoday.com/popcandy), listen to it on the radio (This American Life is the recent fav.), and of course engage it in all the traditional forms as well (mmm... books, TV, movies, magazines). Now, that said, I love ALL pop culture and recently I found that puts me in an interesting unique position. What is the opposite sex perception of the guy who can tell you why high-rise belts take focus off your waist (thanks "What Not To Wear"), who can discuss why Elyse simply committed model suicide at the end of season one, and who can explain why the "Space Cases" theme song changes between seasons 1 and 2 (obviously Catalina and Suzee switch dimensions people)?

The question came to me the other night when eating dinner with some residents. The group was overwhelmingly female, at least a 2-1 ration, and there was only three guys. The conversation (like all conversations between college-aged groups with multiple genders represented) eventually travelled to sex and one of guys questioned whether a colleague of mine was attractive or not. Before most of the girls even get a word out, I can rattle off the postive and negative characteristics of said friend from an opposite sex point of view. It's not a trait I picked up on purpose, but I've been through a few "Maui Fever," "Exposed," "Next," power blocks and I can represent an over-stereotypical perspective. Our female colleagues were legitimately impressed with the observations and from there conversation tackled "America's Next Top Model", Grey's, The Notebook - and eventhough I don't really like any of these programs but yet I'm well versed enough to offer insight and perspective on them (ANTM I get tricked into watching. I'll become smitten with a contestant when flipping through and then I have to watch until she's voted off). It's hysterical at the moment, but in the long run is that a trait that makes someone more or less attractive?

Much like rant #1, the predominant question in this rant is rhetorical, but that won't stop me from this potential answer. If I met a girl who could identify characteristics generally found pleasing and appaulling about the opposite sex, who could rattle off what was on ESPN Page 2 or this week's "South Park" and still had the ability to talk to me about how horny the guy on "Take Home Chef," seems each week - I think I'd be intrigued. Intrigue has to count for something right - it gets your foot in the door at least. Although if this was really a concern for me, not watching marathons of TLC, MTV or Discovery channel programming on weekends would probably get my foot in the door just as easily :-p


C'mon - only the most attractive women in the world shop at the grocery stores where this guy prowls...

--
Glad to see the time off hasn't killed my knack for wordiness. Anyway, like a good college kid it's time to shower before proceeding on an aimless Saturday night social scene (though anything is better than watching these two final four games - Monday better be more competitive). As promised, next month will have at least three posts chalk full of nothing for your reading (dis)pleasure. Until that point, may your evenings be filled with merryment and your ears filled with the tunes of The Hold Steady...

Current Mood: artistic
Thursday, January 18th, 2007
12:51 am
A brief review of our dear friend '06...
Welcome back y'all. It's been too long since I've had a good post. What better way to reverse the action than the mandatory "Year in Review," spiel?

If you're not familiar with the Cuse3421 LiveJournal version of that, here's what we do: Take the first portion of the first post from every month, add a small bit of commentary and toss them all here, in one convenient and accessible location, for some reflection purposes. Months where I didn't post (because I do slack now and then), I look to a friend's journal for some insight. It's always a fun read in the end, so let's get to the beginning shall we?

--

(Mandatory yearly vanity shot)

JANUARY

"Welcome back to the house of hard knocks folks. My name as always is Nathaniel and I'm a champion of hard knocks lately (yea, if you hadn't sensed yet the title is written in a sarcastic tone). School is back in session and the month is almost to an end...so naturally I'm waaaaaay behind when it comes to hitting my monthly quota of three. Here's to nothing, step one in that fulfillment process it coming atcha' ahora...

So this past week I attended a Campus Crusade event for the first time in my life. Had no idea what to expect. Naturally I heard the stereotypical cries of cult and extremeists from people outside the organization, but perhaps the single most compassionate man I've met here at SU is a member of this fine organization. I couldn't leave another semester behind without accompanying him just once. So what did I learn? Sure they plastered the word of Jesus around, but as for what I took away from it - I envy people who find something, anything they are passionate about in life. Passion is perhaps the strongest emotion I have ever witnessed. To see the smile on my friend's face when I entered the Crusade event with him was worth every teeny bit of awkwardness I was afraid to encounter that evening. He was so passionate about the organization; so in his element. A typically humble, perhaps even relatively quiet and shy young man immediately became the Great Gatsby. Playing to the crowd, beaming million dollar smiles at adorers everywhere, and just genuinely being THE life of the event. All because the passion he feels for the group and their cause makes him feel complete, makes him feel at home. I'll be lucky in life if I can ever accomplish something so gratifying as to find something I'm passionate about. Something I can feel like me at, something that completes me. Good luck in this search ladies and gents. It's taken me twenty years and I haven't yet found the thing that really makes me tick, and finding another individual to be passionate about - well that's an ENTIRELY different story...

Current Mood: indescribable
Current Music: Little Dawn - TedLeo&ThePharmacists""

- Had to post all of that because I remember contemplating this late night while listening to that particular Ted Leo album (only three months til' his new one!). Such a memorable year 2006, so memorable...


FEBRUARY


"Ah, holiday fits of joy keeping you sleepless tonight too reader(s)? Well come to the place where there's always someone here to relate to. Welcome back for another round of incoherent dribble - or another one of my LiveJournal entries :) I'll be your host yet again this evening, but I want nothing more than the comfort and serenity of an evening's sleep at this moment. That means let's hit the hard stuff, shall we?...

Current Mood: contemplative
Current Music: "Counting Down The Hours" - TedLeo & ThePharmacists"

- Man, maybe my New Year's resolution was to be bitter.


MARCH


"
Summing up my first weekend home during Spring Break reveals what I truly adore about life. Here's the lowdown on what went down:

- Saturday night I sat a TGIFriday's for multiple hours watching the Cuse' game and bs'ing
- Saturday late night I sat at the center of Archbald (the Munley household) and caught up with some legends
- Sunday afternoon was Perkins with the current leaders in VVHS drama
- Sunday night was one part bowling and one part bottomless cup of tea at Perkins (both activities accompanied by a case of long-windedness)

What's the common denominator? Well yes, food, but I was focusing more on the conversation aspect - meaningful conversation in particular. I'm not referring to what happens when discussing "important" issues (though current events always make good meaningful conversation). I'm referring to the experience you have when every member of a conversation is engaged. Everyone is relaxed in the conversation enviroment. Everyone forgets about whatever else is going on in the world and focuses on the now...and the now typically bleeds good times when conversation is right. The thing about these conversations is that the variables are irrelevant. It doesn't matter who the participants are, what the topic is, or where the convo is located. Honestly, the best conversations are the ones with those loose acquaintances at 2am in some hallway where you discuss life philosophy. If I find someone who can recreate that for me - sign me up. Meaningful conversation makes it all worth it for me. If you're having trouble understanding this or relating to any of the mess I just layed out, get in contact with me. We'll hit the local Dunkin' Donuts and try to remedy the situation...

Current Mood: calm
Current Music: Carlotta Valdez - HarveyDanger"

- I can't wait until I rediscover that very Dunkin' Donuts in a few months. Anyone for bubbletea?


APRIL


"There is one thing I've really tried to improve on personally throughout the year. I've noticed that it's lacking in the general population as well. What's my goal entity? Why it's merely the ability to utilize plain, old straight-forward talk. Let me explain because I know it's not a clear idea (ok, yes that pun was intended). I think this concept is best expressed through an example, and unfortunately the only example I can think of is the common situation of boy and girl when one is interested and the other is not. A simple exchange in that situation might go like this:

"Hey, want to do something Saturday night?"
"Aww, I'd love to but I'm busy."

At first glance nothing big, right? However, often times I would argue there is definitely more than meets the eye to this exchange. Both parties involved could very well be utilizing innuendo instead of just coming forth with their real messages. Think what this situation would be like if it utilized straight-forward talk.

"Hey, I'm interested let's hang out."
"I don't feel the same just leave me alone."

Now I hear all the naysayers with their cries of "harsh" and "too blunt", but consider this. Put yourself in the situation of questioner number one. Would you rather sit analyzing and questioning why the other individual is always busy when you invite them out or would you rather know right up front and then just move on? For me personally, I really want to motivate myself into the straight-forward arena. I've been able to at times this year. If someone is interested I've said I don't feel the same. If someone asks me to come to an event, I say I won't be there instead of offerring a hopeless maybe. To me, it becomes a question of how much honesty do you want in your life. I understand innuendo prevents hurt feelings and denial in the short term, but in the long run it's important to have a clear outlook of your situations in life. I don't know, maybe I'm mumbling an argument for an all ready lost cause. In either case, I'm striving to be more honest with people. I know I slip and offer innuendos every now and then, but identifying that there's a problem is the first step, correct?...


Current Mood: blah
Current Music: "No Diggity" by Blackstreet"

- I might as well just post whole entries. Being concise is not my strong point (unless you're a potential employer reading this, I can be very concise. Just look at my comments on these posts)


MAY


"(Note I attributed this to the newspaper if I ever ran into some copyright infringement case - I thought I did it correctly!!)

BY NATHAN MATTISE
For The Pocono Record
June 03, 2006

Current Mood: nerdy
Current Music: Caught In Suspension - MAE"


- I was so proud of myself for that story. I got major props from the Asst. News Editor. Too bad the paper's Web site someone doesn't keep my stories in the archives (if you really want it, I'll send you a PDF - just let me know).


JUNE


"Every life experience supposedly breeds a valuable lesson, so that begs the question, "What the hell can be taken away so far from summer '06?" Certainly I've learned some valuable business, grammatical and AP style (notice no comma between final items in a series) lessons from my job at the Pocono Record. But (another newspaper thing, I hate it but apparently you can start sentences with conjunctions) out of all the insignificant yet memorable lessons learned so far in May and June, the one which I'll deem most important is that life is most fun at it's extremes - in terms of planning that is.

Think about it. Take the last few times you can honestly say you've had a good time and I'll argue they fall into either polar opposite of the planning spectrum - an event talked about a few days or more in advance, or something that developed no more than ten minutes before departure. For me, I attended a welcome home formal dinner for my sis and Sugar Shane O'Malley made his one week visit to NEPA and we played soccer in splash ponds. These strike me as no-doubt-about-it great times. The first was talked about a day or more in advance and the second was a mere phone call and go situation.

So what type of theory and I'm pushing here? Spontaneity is one of the most overlooked adjectives in life. When anything is spontaneous, it immediately becomes interesting and to me that equates to fun. On the other hand, when something is preplanned, anticipation lurks. You can't argue against Christmas morning or a birthday when you were younger, what I'll say are the most anticipated events in a young life, were hands down the best days of your life. Now to a lesser extent, simply planning to go to a concert or planning to get coffee a few days in advance somehow propels these simple things to a whole other enjoyment eschelon. Maybe I just liked the dinner because we wore suits and a magician showed up, or maybe soccer was fun because I hadn't seen Shane and I had my tie on from work - who knows. Similar findings about the correlation between the amount of preparation and the amount of enjoyment have happened to me often enough throughout life that I'm willing to call it a theory and hang my hat on it. So if anyone wants to get together sometime soon, let's pencil each other in for next week or call me on your way out the door...

Current Mood: complacent
Current Music: "There's A Fire" - Longwave"


- I remember really agreeing with this theory. Anyone for a concert in a month or so?


JULY

"Vaguely playing off the junior year of college reference, I think I've reached a point in my life where the rolling of the eyes was invented. I'm referring to that moment in life where everyone, and I mean everyone, needs to take stock of where you are now and more importantly what comes next. It's the "is there a special someone," "what kind of internship are you lining up for next summer," "what do you want to do after school," barrage from every relative and friend-of-the-family within a 30 mile radius. I'd like to go on the record with my distaste for it. It sucks.

(FYI - There is no girl / I barely know what I will be doing this school year, let alone next summer / I'll avoid the dreaded "real world" as long as I can. Hello apartment for 7 people upon graduation as I starve as a [I don't even know what I'll be, but all kids straight out of college are financially burdened])


Current Mood: thoughtful
Current Music: "Lightning Blue Eyes" - Secret Machines"

- I think this point lasts years at a time. Anyone else feelin' like that?


AUGUST


"Stolen from my darling Cara
"

Open your playlist, pick songs that start with each letter of your username, but the songs have to mean something to you. Don't just pick a song because it starts with a letter in your username. Post the list to your journal. If you want, you can explain why the songs are important to you and/or upload them for people to listen to, but it's not required. Do it if you want to!"

- Stolen from Justin, who stole it from Cara :) Seems like a good game though, here's mine:

Chips Ahoy! by TheHoldSteady
Underwater by ClapYourHandsAndSayYeah
Superstition by StevieWonder
Everlong by TheFooFighters


SEPTEMBER

"Welcome back folks. I know. It's been a long, anticipation-ridden hiatus, but after a month of life being consumed by the transition back to school and the transition into being Nate-the-RA...tada! I have free time for a post. I could catch everyone up on some experiences and philosophies I've developed over the past 30-odd days, but I'm not in the right frame of mind. I've been reading online blogs for the past two hours (if you want my favorites, ESPN.com's Page 2 and USAToday.com's Pop-Candy, flat out nervous stuff). I need to rant on things that are worthless unless otherwise ranted on. Let's begin shall we...


Current Mood: Antsy
Current Music: Love Is All Around - Joan Jett"

- Oh the beginning of Nate the RA... those were naive days :-


OCTOBER


"3 a.m. (or maybe it's 2 a.m., 1 a.m., 4 a.m. for others) represents the culmination of my life right now. It's the moment in my day when I get to snatch Adam Sandler's absurd time controlling remote and press pause. Things are still happening, I know when I unpause in the morning everything will be back at full speed, but for that brief moment when I sit in relative silence on my couch there's a moment of ultimate tranquility with my life held constant. It speaks to how ragged college students, and young people in general, have to run themselves to remain on track this day and age. We balance academics, employment, relationships, anxiety about the future, and all these other more specific current obligations so much and so often that sometimes we just need a second to breathe. If someone ten years older than me was doing this I bet they'd check into a rehab center. But for a college student all you need is that one beautiful moment. To sit, to reflect, to breathe, to brace for what's ahead, to refocus why you put yourself through all this, to keep your sanity, to tell yourself you can wake up and do it all over again tomorrow, the day after that, the week after that, and the years after that. 3 a.m. keeps me going, even if constantly going is what keeps me at 3 a.m...

Current Mood: optimistic
Current Music: Alone, Jealous and Stoned - Secret Machines"

- It's getting close to that time as we speak. I do enjoy a good late night slice of Utopia..


NOVEMBER


"We'll skip the intro since my bed is beckoning. In the last entry, I mentioned I went to Rochester last week on a musical pilgrimage to Ted Leo. Luckily for all, the events were documented in Bill Simmons' travel diary style. This is the abridged version that will be running in The Student Voice this week (so consider this the free sneak peek). Enjoy and if you want full details on the ridiculousness, e-mail me for the deleted scenes and unedited version :)


Current Mood: tired
Current Music: Hopsital - Cold War Kids"

- I don't know how funny my edited version of the Ted Leo pilgrimage was, but Simmons really does have an art form with these running diaries. Check out his latest one here (it's March Madness-themed):
The Sports Guy's "Pure Madness"


DECEMBER

"getting over it sucks.

but hating people doesn't.

unless you have to spend a lot of time with them."

- This individual's LiveJournal probably inspired me to start my own. He's a solid, intriguing writer - just keeps it real.

--
So...yep. That was unbearable.

Anyway, thanks for stopping by and waltzing down memory lane with me this evening. I swear next time with be something substantial (though judge "substantial" based on what you've just seen - it won't be much). I need to start my core temperature warming process to deal with the chilly Syracuse nights, so while I heat up I hope you cool down, and as always, continue to enjoy the luscious sounds of Bloc Party...

Current Mood: tired
Thursday, November 30th, 2006
11:44 pm
What - no snow yet?
Salutations sirs and madams, welcome back to the classiest rag on the World Wide Web. As always you can look forward to a healthy dosage of rambling, cute word play (or poor word play depending on your interpretation) and a whole lot of meaningful, meaningless copy. The long awaited first podcast is scheduled in December to end the year the right way (and to give me a simple topic to start with - a "Year in Review"). With that lone announcement out of the way, time to hit the meat and potatoes of this BS'ing...
--

College is supposedly wild right? I claim to be someone who battles monotony on a daily basis, and think there are many others who will claim a similar "spontaneity" if you will - right? Well how come no one fully appreciates life's vignettes, those tender moments in which you find yourself asking, "Is this really happening,"? During break while in NEPA, I find people who are more than willing to "do nothing," for a night and you always end up with at least one great life vignette. At school however, everyone always needs something to do. We need to go out; we need to be around tons of people. I guess it's just not fun to focus on the company of others and the subtle nuances of life. College kids need action, action, action even though no one will deny how terrible a full slate of classes and outside work can be. Go figure.

That's why it was refreshing for me on my last great pre-break experience two weeks ago. A few of my residents (yes, students who just get onto a college campus aren't yet infected by the "It's not fun unless we are doing something," virus) and I were sitting around in nothingness at 11:30 on a Saturday night. The call to duty in the fight against monotony came blaring. We all dawned blazers and scarves to really enhance the anti-status quo theme of the adventure, then we hit a trendy little bubble tea shop. The place literally had nothing but the Garden State soundtrack and Imogen Heap's "Speak for Yourself," playing. It was predictable, yet loveable enough to be a good copycat film.

Afterward we went to seediest diner in the area, appropriately named the Little Gem. At this point it's about 1:30 a.m., so it's only natural that we start talking about literature (though with the college student spin of "Who is the hottest literary character?" - My vote was for Catherine from East of Eden, the type of individual who is such a bitch that you can't resist her - anyway...). Our conversation gets us noticed by the couple who just sat down at the booth behind us. The man is obviously intoxicated, so he doesn't hesitate to ask us where we're from. He's disappointed when we rattle off mostly northeast states because he assumed we must have been from Britain since we were having such an "academic" conversation. Since he knows about us now, he asks us to guess about him and his wife. They're in the low-30s. He puts a $100 bucks on the table and asks us to guess how many kids he has. 2, 3, 4, 6 (I really was mad we guessed six. I thought that had it and I would have been really pissed if he gave us $100)? With his ten kids revealed, he goes back to sit down and deliver a profanity laden rant on life to us. At that moment his wife leans in, and delivers one of those out-of-body messages that must be from a higher power.

"Don't worry about him. You boys are just fine, and if you keep on track you'll succeed. Go ahead, go back to your meal, go on your way and forget about us."

Maybe we over analyzed it, but you have to admit it's a deeper monologue than The Matrix. So sad yet wise for this woman, whose husband would later just yell at her for contradicting him to us as we left, to grace us with such a philosophical thought. Go on with our meal? Go on with all the life we have left to live and make the most of it? Go on with our collegiate privileges and make the most out of it so we can forget being saddled with an embarrassing mate at some seedy diner? It just blew my mind. And that experience was all because I found three compadres willing to adventure into nothing. Stop, breath, enjoy the vignettes folks. And on the rare occasion when you go on a search for them, make sure you take note.
--

Well, I'm sure none of that will make sense in the morning. Either way, that's all I've got in me tonight. One paper separates me from three finals, which in turn separate me from Winter Break. So best of luck with the end of the year stretch run readers. Keep your eyes peeled for a couple of entries (especially when I have the luxury of break) and listen for the first ever Cuse3421 livejournal podcast due in December. Until then, enjoy the first snowfall of the year when it finally gets here, and make sure you indulge in the sounds of The Fiery Furnaces.

Current Mood: determined
Wednesday, November 1st, 2006
3:03 am
This one's for Bill Simmons
We'll skip the intro since my bed is beckoning. In the last entry, I mentioned I went to Rochester last week on a musical pilgrimage to Ted Leo. Luckily for all, the events were documented in Bill Simmons' travel diary style. This is the abridged version that will be running in The Student Voice this week (so consider this the free sneak peek). Enjoy and if you want full details on the ridiculousness, e-mail me for the deleted scenes and unedited version :)

--


“Rock and Road Trip”
NATHAN MATTISE
Entertainment Editor
Word Count: 798


Roadtrippin’ for a concert is an art form. On Friday, Oct. 27, Ted Leo and The Pharmacists were playing in Rochester – roughly only a four hour roundtrip away - and my friend Stuch and I splurged the $22 for tickets. We kept track of what happened so we could give a little insight into the nuisances of how a concert road trip should go.

5:57 p.m. I fill my tank, pick Stuch up and finally hit 81-North. Gotta’ start with an essential part of any road trip – the driving mix. Stuch prepared one that included CCR, David Bowie, Eve 6, OK Go, and to my displeasure, George Thorogood.

“C’mon man, George Thorogood. All his songs are about driving. Well, or drinking.”

“Great, he loved drinking and driving.”

“No man. That was Billy Joel.”

7:27 p.m. After an hour and a half of driving, we’re finally in Rochester. We park on a side road to avoid the $8 event parking, then narrowly escape jaywalking death so we can eat quick at Wendy’s. The place is loaded with kids obviously going to the concert. I literally overhear someone trying to justify calling Dennis Quaid the new Bob Saget.

7:58 p.m. We battle the crowd, pick up our tickets and hurry to our seats. We’re closer to the stage than I am to my professors in any class. Like the insane performer he is, Ted Leo started his set two minutes early. As things get going Stuch reminds me that immediately after Ted Leo’s set, he’s leaving, going to my car and listening to the songs Ted Leo didn’t play.

8:12 p.m. I pull the “you should be jealous I’m here and you’re not,” phone call to my sister. You know, the one where you dial the number and then just hold the phone up so she can hear the awesomeness on stage. It’s a real jerk move.

8:14 p.m. I do the same thing to the man who turned me onto Ted Leo and The Pharmacists. We affectionately call him the Professor.

8:48 p.m. Ted Leo ends his set with the song “Biomusicology.” He played everything you could want – “Me and Mia,” “Counting Down The Hours,” “The High Party.” If you’ve never listened to Ted Leo or haven’t seen him live, you’re missing out. He’s the kind of performer who gets your heart rate up. Just infectious energy on stage when he plays. “Why Ted Leo hasn’t yet made it big,” is officially up there as one of life’s most perplexing questions. Right next to “Did people once genuinely like Linkin Park?”

9:17 p.m. We’re ten minutes into their set, and Stuch insists the drummer for Death Cab is my former instructor from the SUMB. “We came all this way, why couldn’t he?” I admit the facial hair and mannerisms are dead-on. I guess I need to find out where Josh Dekaney was on Oct. 27.

9:30 p.m. Death Cab finally introduces themselves as a Seattle-based band. Stuch responds without hesitating, “Grundge came from Seattle, not emo.” Five minutes later when they finally start playing again, we notice kids above us dancing around like the spirit just came down upon them and they’ve been possessed by a higher power.

9:58 p.m. Predictable acoustic portion of the set begins.

10:14 p.m. Predictable portion of the show where everyone shows they can play a different instrument begins. This is also around the time where we notice an odd odor in the area. “You know what I’m going to associate that with? It smells like emo. You’re going to write that down aren’t you?”

10:23 p.m. Death Cab finishes playing and proceeds to get a three minute standing ovation. They’re back stage, swaggering all over the place, and then…

10:26 p.m. Predictable encore to close the night begins. Everyone’s been on their feet for Death Cab’s entire set, so naturally this is the point where Stuch decides to sit down. They play three songs and leave to a deafening (that’s an understatement) applause.

11:43 p.m. We finally head for home - even though the concert ended an hour ago. We decided it would be a good idea to sneak around the back of the building (The Rochester Auditorium, which bears a striking resemblance to Rydell High School), and wait an hour, in the rain, in case Ted Leo decided to embrace his fans.

In the end, the only thing that came out of that was a need to stop at a Thruway McDonalds. Luckily, as fate would have it Ted Leo is coming through New York in November. He’s in NYC on Nov. 7 and 8, which means one thing. The only thing standing between us and sharing a post concert McFlurry with our rock icon is an eight hour roundtrip. Stay tuned.

--
Hopefully this is the first of many accounts of successful rock road trips. Next destination: The Strokes, if anyone is interested. Until then, keep warm with the hot sounds of the Fiery Furnances...

Current Mood: tired
Monday, October 30th, 2006
3:11 am
Captain Re-Establishes Itself as Tasty in My Mouth.
Buenas noches, hermanos y hermanas. Me llamo Nathan y este esta mi vidajournal (and to think they say you can't retain all the knowledge you gain). It's been a drought for content here in the cuse3421 LiveJournal but in the modified words of Matisyahu, here comes water for your literary soul when it gets thirsty. As you can see, there is no rust on my ability to reference or be lame. So before my Kenny Rogers magic wears off (or the ump has me wash it off) let's hit the books, shall we?

--
As an aspiring writer, I think it's my duty to sample various writing styles. Usually in this particular blog-realm, I specialize in rants or lists with an occasional journalistic flare. Offline, I recently submitted some poems for publishing; actually they were just old LiveJournal entries where I took random sentences and them fragments, so I need to expand my horizons even further. That's why I'm content with writing an analytical entry that will attempt to answer the question: why am I still awake at quarter to two on a Monday? That academic analytic paper facet of my writing toolbelt just doesn't get exercised enough, you know?

(This is the point in the article where I got incredibly tired and therefore, saved and went to bed. However, to remain accurate, I waited until the time stamp listed above to continue this article. The original article probably started on the evening of Thursday, October 26, and I was going to write I was awake out of excitement for the Ted Leo / Death Cab for Cutie show the following night. Now, I'm awake on a night without a next-day-concert excuse so this requires some stronger analytical thinking...)

So 3 a.m., why are we becoming better friends as my college career presses forward? I'm an individual who needs a hearty 6 to 8 hrs of sleep, and luckily my academic schedule allows that even with my extended fall store hours. There are many individuals my age who find themselves in this position: it's well past the time your mother would want you in bed, you've finished up your work or you're past the point of caring and yet you're up, listening to music, watching a movie, reading something. Ridiculous, right? But at this moment, I really don't think it's the most illogical thing in the world.

3 a.m. (or maybe it's 2 a.m., 1 a.m., 4 a.m. for others) represents the culmination of my life right now. It's the moment in my day when I get to snatch Adam Sandler's absurd time controlling remote and press pause. Things are still happening, I know when I unpause in the morning everything will be back at full speed, but for that brief moment when I sit in relative silence on my couch there's a moment of ultimate tranquility with my life held constant. It speaks to how ragged college students, and young people in general, have to run themselves to remain on track this day and age. We balance academics, employment, relationships, anxiety about the future, and all these other more specific current obligations so much and so often that sometimes we just need a second to breathe. If someone ten years older than me was doing this I bet they'd check into a rehab center. But for a college student all you need is that one beautiful moment. To sit, to reflect, to breathe, to brace for what's ahead, to refocus why you put yourself through all this, to keep your sanity, to tell yourself you can wake up and do it all over again tomorrow, the day after that, the week after that, and the years after that. 3 a.m. keeps me going, even if constantly going is what keeps me at 3 a.m...

--
Nervous post, right (just make it happen, I'd like to see that adjective take off with a positive connotation. Like, "college basketball starts in one day, that's nervous.")? Anyway, I'll guarantee one more post before the month is over and then I'm making an executive decision to switch to two posts a month - I know, sadness for all involved. However, to make up for that single lost post, I'm adding something to the LiveJournal - a single monthly podcast! I'm addicted to listening to them online and I really want to put together an amateur one myself, so what better forum than a blog I keep together with shoelaces and duct tape? Keep an eye out for the first one coming in early- to mid-November. Until then, Happy Halloween folks! And to celebrate the day, you should totally be listening to the dark and horrifying tracks of the new Nightmare Before Christmas soundtrack (I'll even regretfully suggest Fallout Boy did a good job on it)...

Current Mood: optimistic
Friday, September 15th, 2006
11:06 pm
It's never good when I can't remember the last time I posted...
Welcome back folks. I know. It's been a long, anticipation-ridden hiatus, but after a month of life being consumed by the transition back to school and the transition into being Nate-the-RA...tada! I have free time for a post. I could catch everyone up on some experiences and philosophies I've developed over the past 30-odd days, but I'm not in the right frame of mind. I've been reading online blogs for the past two hours (if you want my favorites, ESPN.com's Page 2 and USAToday.com's Pop-Candy, flat out nervous stuff). I need to rant on things that are worthless unless otherwise ranted on. Let's begin shall we...
--

Al Gore popped up in Syracuse, N.Y. last night. He was invited to speak at the Landmark Theater for about 3,000 people in honor of Syracuse University's Student Association's 50th anniversary. Naturally, to relevantly celebrate our student politics' fiftieth year in existence, Al Gore only talked about one thing - the environment.

I'll preface this by saying how nature and I don't get along. I'm the kid on camping trips who the bugs develop a taste for, the kid who can't go in the woods because there's no tp, the kid who complains that the ground surprisingly isn't as flat and as comfortable as my bed. But if you bring Al Gore - Vice President Al Gore, Won-the-2000-Popular-Election Al Gore, 'I was a secret character in the original NBA Jam' Al Gore - to campus... he needs to say a word or two about US politics. Yes, he dropped some current administration bashing jokes here and there, but I could watch the Daily Show and get that and more every weeknight. The environment is a real concern and I'm glad it finally has someone with real name recognition championing it, but isn't there another celebrity who can tag-out Al Gore so he can come back to politics? What's Jason Schwartzman doing now? He had to be a tree-hugger in college...

Nick Lachey is coming to the same Landmark Theater this week. Two years ago it wouldn't be cool to go see him, but now I'm all about Lacheyemo. What? Lacheyemo you ask? It's the new musical style blending solo-boy-band-pop with emo and it made me a believer out of Nick Lachey. Getting dumped by Jessica Simpson was the best thing that ever happened to him. Before that, he was a jacked, ridiculously good looking man who sang in a B-list boy band and put up with an idiot wife on realityTV. Now? He's a jacked, ridiculously good looking man who sang in a B-list boy band and got his heart thrown down a set of stairs. There is no musical energy quite like the broken heart of a man (c'mon, Bon Jovi anyone?) Nick Lachey and his Lacheyemo officially moved into the top five in the 'Manliest Things in Current Mainstream America' poll...
(For those who care, he currently ranks fourth on the list. He's above the entire cast on Rockstar but still below HHH in the MillerLite commercials, Brady Quinn and Ernest Hemmingway)

--
I would go on and on, but time is of the essence. My radio show (the 90s Rock Block with Nathaniel T. Nostalgia - get it on 89.1 fm in the Syracuse area or www.syracuse.com/z89 from anywhere) starts in ten minutes. Tune in midnight until 2 a.m. every Friday for some ridiculousness, my opinions on it, and a whole lot of great 90s tunes. Until then, I hope your evenings are merry and bright, and that all your angles are right. Keep truckin' and listen to We Are Scientists. Seriously, do it...

Current Mood: Antsy
Monday, July 31st, 2006
2:35 am
They wouldn't accept July 34 as a valid date. Who knew?
There's nothing quite like a heat index pushing 120 to inspire 15 minutes of writing. Hello to everyone out in would-be reader land, hope the air conditioning is plentiful and that your clothing is minimal (in the most tasteful way possible, no one likes to look sleazy). With August basically upon us, the start of the next school year looms. If you're under (let's say) 25, this is where the calendar officially starts; January falls somewhere in the middle along with winter break and May is your finish line. I myself have a week before I need to lace up the runners for the junior year edition of college, so since time became an endangered resource let's cut the already overdone intro and hit the rambling...

--
Vaguely playing off the junior year of college reference, I think I've reached a point in my life where the rolling of the eyes was invented. I'm referring to that moment in life where everyone, and I mean everyone, needs to take stock of where you are now and more importantly what comes next. It's the "is there a special someone," "what kind of internship are you lining up for next summer," "what do you want to do after school," barrage from every relative and friend-of-the-family within a 30 mile radius. I'd like to go on the record with my distaste for it. It sucks.

(FYI - There is no girl / I barely know what I will be doing this school year, let alone next summer / I'll avoid the dreaded "real world" as long as I can. Hello apartment for 7 people upon graduation as I starve as a [I don't even know what I'll be, but all kids straight out of college are financially burdened])

To all of this pressure to push forward in life, I have one thing to say. Fuck it (yea, cursing. See, I'm still way immature). What's wrong with enjoying life as it is now, or even striving to maintain a youthful side? In my humble opinion, the pressure everyone places on you to move forward in life is absurd. I'm 20 years old and I'm going to work until my 60s, possibly beyond with how the state of the economy and social security. So, rather than worrying about my job placement after graduation yesterday I played kickball. Instead of managing my long term portfolio options (yes, I really get Fidelity letters about this all the time and my mother screams at me to take care of them), I play ultimate frisbee. I still like girls who will go on the swings, I don't want to cut my hair, I think it's OK to watch cartoons, and when I want to eat ice cream it still makes sense to me to drive 25 minutes to Jitty Joe's rather than go to the Sno-Ho in Eynon.

All I'm saying is, if maturity is measured in how fast you're moving forward in life than I want to be immature and enjoy the ride. I like doing things that force me to feel that childhood sense of wonder. If that feeling overshadows an urgency to make something with my life, I'm ok with that at the moment. I've got another two years of college and an infinite amount of time after to make my mark on the world, maybe settle in to find romance and a family, and, if life treats me well at all, I'll manage to schedule a night for pogs, monopoly and marco polo in the pool in there too...
--
I need to start writing 3 or more entries a month so I can become concise again, eh? Expect another July entry when it's not 2:32 a.m. tomorrow, but it won't be anything spectacular. I'm thinking another "here's some great articles," post because really...that's all I do at work is read. Until then, may all your slumbers be free of sweat, your bodies be full of thirst quenching fluids, and your stereos blaring with the classically smooth jazz of Dave Brubeck...

Current Mood: thoughtful
Friday, June 30th, 2006
11:31 pm
I think I prefer cashews over the mixed nuts...
Well hello sir and madam. It's a pleasure to welcome all of you potential readers back to the Cuse3421. If you've ever dined with us before, you know the drill. Pointless banter with sometimes creative writing, sometimes blunt writing, and always slightly below average ability to entertain. That being said, there is a true treat in store today. Rather than ramble on about the topic floating in my head at the moment (which would be "How I wish to be as passionate about something as Europeans are about football" in case anyone is wondering), I've decided to allow any unfortunate soul who stumbles in to read this filth a chance to read actually compelling pieces. SO...the following is a list of some of my recent favorites. Enjoy. Listen to Mando Diao if you get a chance as well. -Author

1) http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=simmons/060629
If you know anything about the NBA or college basketball, this article about the recent draft is hysterical. HYS-TER-I-CAL! (That's in Stephen A. Smith font as readers of this article will soon find out)

2) http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=simmons/060626
Another beauty from ESPN's Page 2. Bill Simmons (king of sports humor journalism) selects his 33 favorite YouTube clips for your viewing pleasure - although the William Shatner "Rocket Man" he refers to from time to time in his column is noticeably absent.

3) http://web.lexis-nexis.com.libezproxy2.syr.edu/universe/document?_m=4eb5ac717eec84d0dfb45be7ec47b315&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=2be836d9eb6bf256760d367fb9d97581
This gem from the New York Times' Thursday Styles section. These guys pick the greatest fashion trends to write about and it was no different this time around. What's back for Summer '06? Why, short sleeve dress shirts, of course...
*Note* If this one doesn't work, drop me a line and I'll email it.

4)http://web.lexis-nexis.com.libezproxy2.syr.edu/universe/document?_m=798a1d53e2ee22e83a8942355f9bc0a7&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVA&_md5=66f42f102a10daf9799000ea0a9aaf87
Must be some type of two for deal going on tonight. Anyway, another read from the NY Times' Thursday Styles section. This one about Adam Morrisons (the proper name I'll make synonymous with facial hair) becoming the fashion trend for the year 2006.
*Note* If this one doesn't work, drop me a line and I'll email it.

5) http://www.x-entertainment.com/articles/0904/
No, that's not porn. It is however rod-shaped and excellent, Jell-O Pudding Pops of course. From my favorite nostalglia web site, x-entertainment.com (everything is funny, read about Kamala's web site), this account is about the 2004 resurgence of the beloved Jell-O pudding pop.

*Bonus*) http://www.poconorecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060610/NEWS01/606100301
This girl lives in Stroudsburg. She really asked me to go out to the bars with her and her friends. Her picture on hooterscalendar.com (Girl of The Year - Top 25 - She's on the bottom right, "Teresa"), is much better.

Current Mood: tired
5:24 pm
Three entries in a day? This guarantees one of them will be a cop out...
York peppermint patties plus orange juice equals crazy delicious folks; almost as scrumptious as another addition of the Cuse3421 LiveJournal. It's been a fast paced month of June and suprise, suprise...I haven't written anything yet in my LiveJournal (or my real journal for that matter). A rainy afternoon preventing me from going running seems like the perfect opportunity to change that however, so let's trim the fat, get concise, and hit this entry...

---

Every life experience supposedly breeds a valuable lesson, so that begs the question, "What the hell can be taken away so far from summer '06?" Certainly I've learned some valuable business, grammatical and AP style (notice no comma between final items in a series) lessons from my job at the Pocono Record. But (another newspaper thing, I hate it but apparently you can start sentences with conjunctions) out of all the insignificant yet memorable lessons learned so far in May and June, the one which I'll deem most important is that life is most fun at it's extremes - in terms of planning that is.

Think about it. Take the last few times you can honestly say you've had a good time and I'll argue they fall into either polar opposite of the planning spectrum - an event talked about a few days or more in advance, or something that developed no more than ten minutes before departure. For me, I attended a welcome home formal dinner for my sis and Sugar Shane O'Malley made his one week visit to NEPA and we played soccer in splash ponds. These strike me as no-doubt-about-it great times. The first was talked about a day or more in advance and the second was a mere phone call and go situation.

So what type of theory and I'm pushing here? Spontaneity is one of the most overlooked adjectives in life. When anything is spontaneous, it immediately becomes interesting and to me that equates to fun. On the other hand, when something is preplanned, anticipation lurks. You can't argue against Christmas morning or a birthday when you were younger, what I'll say are the most anticipated events in a young life, were hands down the best days of your life. Now to a lesser extent, simply planning to go to a concert or planning to get coffee a few days in advance somehow propels these simple things to a whole other enjoyment eschelon. Maybe I just liked the dinner because we wore suits and a magician showed up, or maybe soccer was fun because I hadn't seen Shane and I had my tie on from work - who knows. Similar findings about the correlation between the amount of preparation and the amount of enjoyment have happened to me often enough throughout life that I'm willing to call it a theory and hang my hat on it. So if anyone wants to get together sometime soon, let's pencil each other in for next week or call me on your way out the door...

---

Feels good to get a rant out of the way, even if conciseness wasn't exercised whatsoever. It's still raining outside, so prepare yourselves for another entry no one will read in an hour or so (post shower, it's a necessity at this point in the day). Until then, I'll keep my intros and outros lame, my body paragraphs too dense, and my catchy indie music (compliments of Marywood University's radio station) playing the whole time. Take care of yourselves out there in reader land, tip your waitress, make your bed, and take the time to invest in the French-rock energy of Phoenix...

Current Mood: complacent
Wednesday, May 31st, 2006
3:12 pm
Tada - here's the end of May!
It was a bright cold day in May, and the clocks were striking thirteen. Wait, wrong story (but the keen observer will notice a mistake in it - anyway). Welcome back for some literary allusions and promises of fun here in the Cuse3421 LiveJournal. Another month is quickly passing by and now that year two of college is over there is much ado about nothing (or "a lot of meaningless banter to cover" and many lame allusions to be had). I'll spare anyone all ready questioning why they've read up to this point any more harmless puns, and start this jive out...

I have been home for roughly two weeks. Unfortunately, I have not had the opportunity to see and hang with all the people who make the valley memorable at this point. I have however, had the following occur:


- Received an invitation from a Hooters calendar girl to go out to the bars, TWO nights in a row.

- Played frisbee at 11:30 p.m. only to be interrupted by a unidentified streaker.

- Witnessed a plethora of drunk highschools watching two of their drunk peers engaging in intercourse in the back of a pickup truck

- Sat in a parking lot and did my best minstrel imitation as Stuch and I performed an acoustic version of the Brokeback Mountain theme

- Went for a run by myself at 9 p.m. in an empty athletic complex

- Got my iPod back: fully functional!

- Started working at a daily newspaper where not only do I get to write, report, edit and get published, but I get to dress like an adult daily (business casual with the ocassional tie for me).

- I founded a band called "The Corps of Discovery" in dedication of Mr. Kushmerik's 10th grade history video documentary of Lewis and Clark.

(The list can probably continue with the randomness that daily life in NEPA brings, but I'll choose to stop and jump to the next post due to time constraints. Yes that's right. This is basically one long entry split into three posts so I can fufill my self-imposed quota of three posts per month)
2:48 pm
May????
(Continued from the previous post, though I decided to make the rant stretch only two entries. My third and final entry to fill quota will simply be my first article published for the Pocono Record even if it didn't run until the first weekend in June)

Out of all that random hyjinx, I find that the most satisfying moment was...

Running at 9 p.m. in an abandoned Mellow complex one evening.

This realization made me conclude that regardless of how exciting, amazing or (any of the appropriate antonyms used as an adjective) life may be, everyone needs to find something that can act as an escape. This desire is what fuels the literature, film and television industries. Without this basic need (a routine avenue for escape), I feel that life simply goes by in an eratic blur.

For me - the escape route is running. I love feeling each individual stride make contact with whatever surface is below my feet. The cool sweat envelopes you after only ten minutes or so and you feel like you can go forever. I even like the sound of rythymic breathing if my iPod decides it wants to take the afternoon off. Everything about a single run appeals to me, but the kicker is that it relaxes my mind at the same time. I focus on nothing else besides my current physical enviroment and that next stretch of land.

This is what any good escape will do. You forget about all the petty irks of life like how the transition back to living with your parents is difficult or how frustrated the opposite sex can make a person. Running has that ironic double-edge that it is my mental escape but can obvious act as a physical escape as well (I think driving alone at night offers a similiar feeling). Escapes don't need to be physical though. Music, reading, naps in the sun, playing with little kids or pets (yes - I lumped little kids and pets) : all of those possess the ability to defuse all the white noise from life and put you into a moment of peaceful serenity. So the next time a lack of excitement has you down on the summer break or work is running you ragged, I suggest lacing up your sneakers. Whatever method you choose, just make sure it gets you away from the problems and gives you a second to think and relax...

That's all I've got. One pretty poorly written rant and it is coming way, way after deadline. May was certainly not my best work, but June is another month and as always I'll try and do better the next time. As for now, I need to sleep before I spend my entire day writing at the newspaper tomorrow. This means toothbrush and blanket for me, but for the readers out there - snuggle into bed with the harmonies of The Magic Numbers.

Current Mood: tired
Tuesday, May 30th, 2006
12:05 pm
Three posts for May - all right ;)
(Note I attributed this to the newspaper if I ever ran into some copyright infringement case - I thought I did it correctly!!)

BY NATHAN MATTISE
For The Pocono Record
June 03, 2006

Pocono Mountain East ended its boys' varsity baseball season this week with a tough loss in the District 11 Class AAAA championship game.

The 16 players worked hard all season. They each received a district medal Thursday.

Well, all but one.

"Last night we got our runner-up district medals and we kept one for Jimmy," said Pocono Mountain East coach Bill Carter.

"Jimmy," or Jim Kennedy, is a 16-year-old sophomore outfielder at Pocono Mountain East who plays on the Cardinals' varsity team. He was raised in Florida, but two years ago moved to the Poconos and now lives in Reeders with his mother, Lynn Kennedy, and his three younger siblings. He has played baseball his entire life.

"Take baseball away from him and it's like taking oxygen away from a normal person," Lynn Kennedy said.

Unfortunately, another constant in Kennedy's life is what prevented him from participating in the Cardinals' recent district playoff run. He has epilepsy.

Epilepsy, according to epilepsy.com, an online resource provided by the Epilepsy Therapy Development Project, is a neurological condition, also known as a seizure disorder, diagnosed after a person has had at least two seizures that were not caused by a known medical condition.

Kennedy has experienced some form of seizures his entire life. His mother said it wasn't until he turned 12, when Kennedy grew physically and started getting more involved in sports, that he started having grand mal seizures. Such seizures can last up to five minutes and include losing conscientiousness, falling to the ground and thrashing uncontrollably.

Kennedy visited neurologists in Florida and received anti-seizure medication, but nothing seemed to work.

The frequency of seizures stayed low — only one or two per year — until late 2005, when he had eight seizures in a month.

"Emotionally, it's hard to go through, and physically, it's hard because scrapes, cuts, and bumps "" it takes a while to heal," Kennedy said. "It stresses me out sometimes, but then I take a few deep breaths, think about what I have ahead of me and see if I can overcome this. That way I can keep on going with baseball and all."

The increase in seizure frequency is what has separated Kennedy from his Cardinal teammates recently; he was admitted to the Geisinger Medical Center in Danville a week before Christmas.

Kennedy's neurologist performed tests and was able to detect a problem in the left frontal lobe of his brain. He was given a new prescription and referred to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

The medicine allowed Kennedy to be seizure-free for more than four months, but on Monday he and his mom headed to Minnesota.

"The kids know him and they know the situation," Carter said. "He told us he was going, so on Saturday's practice we all said our goodbye and good luck. That was the main thing. The good luck."

At the Mayo Clinic, Kennedy was taken off his anti-seizure medication. Neurologists are waiting for him to experience a seizure in a controlled environment so they can run tests and get a greater understanding of his condition.

"They told us we'll be here from five to nine business days, but knowing I'm around the top professionals in this field gets me happy and excited that this could be the final stop for me," Kennedy said. "I could walk out of here and be, I guess, normal you would say and not have to worry about that stuff again. The thought of it being done would really make me happy."

[BREAKOUT BOX]

Help for Jim
You Can Help

Two fundraising events will be held to help pay Jim Kennedy's medical bills.

• The first is today, a flea market fundraiser in the parking lot of Pocono Ambulatory Surgery Center, Storm St., Stroudsburg, from from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

• The second will be a car wash on June 25 in Starner's BP, routes 715 and 611, Tannersville, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., put on by Pocono Mountain East baseball parents.

Current Mood: nerdy
Sunday, April 30th, 2006
9:46 pm
Mr. West, you enjoyed SU too?
Oh the agony! Welcome back to the show folks. As always we're running behind and cramming as many irrelevant thoughts as we can into the waning moments of April for your reading pleasure. I'll try and keep it brief again, this time for me and the four hours of sleep I received last night (I know I'm a baby for complaining about four hours, but typically thought I get 6-8). Anyway I need to pseudo-clean my room for all of the women I have circulating through there in the next week or two - mainly my mother and little sister - so in order to guarantee the proper amount of cleaning time I've got to cut it right to the literature. Now...


I've been reading magazines and watching movies for the larger portion of my life. Typically I will take anything on can get my hands on or my eyes in front of, but lately it seems like all the media I take in is focused on one thing - summer love. It's a novel concept really. Go home, meet someone with a good first impression and cute physique, add in some late nights in the good weather and voala', you've gota month or two of memories to make. I'm all for this business, going into the unknown, trying something new, looking for romance. Only one thing holds me (and I assume a decent amount of men) back from exploring this glorified horizion.

Everyone (yes, everyone) tells me you need to be aggressive in order to meet someone.

Now I'm not a shy kid. I'll put myself out there for people to criticize and I feel I can have a legitimate, meaningful conversation with just about anyone. That being said, if I'm out at some social event and I've been playing eye contact tango with a girl across the room all night, all I can ever seem to muster up is a warm smile her way and maybe an under-my-breath muttered hello if we ever come within 5 to 10 feet of each other. It's ridiculous. It's not if I haven't been rejected before or if I don't have the confidence to think someone might actually go for a guy like me. There's just an awkwardness involved when approaching a stranger who can probably assume what your agenda is that even I can't embrace, and I love awkwardness. Let it be known that when someone approaches you randomly with an obvious attraction to you, it takes a whole lot of gusto and swagger to even make the attempt.

I know that according to all the magazines and movies I need to develop this aspect of mating, the ability to be aggressive and approach. I just don't see a good way to go about gaining that ability. Where on earth is this whole rant going? How about an unwritten agreement that if someone you have potential interest in approaches you, don't make them work too hard. Make them feel welcome, not awkward. A positive experience approaching a stranger would certainly both make my day and give me the desire to try it again sometime. I promise to be nice when you approach me if you spread the word to your friends, it'll be a "Pay it Forward" philosophy only applied to dating. I think Kevin Spacey would be proud...

Since my eyes are physically hurting at the moment, it's probably a good time to grab some shut eye. I'll apologize for how brief the rants have been lately, but once finals week leaves me I'll be sure to churn out some really drawn out ones that no one would dare read upon first look. So until I suck up enough air to regain golden long-windedness, I must bid you the reader adieu for the night. I hope the upcoming month of May is a very, very merry one for you. I hope you get more sleep in the next week and a half than I do. Most of all, I hope that you continue to embrace the lower tier rap scene and try a small sampling of RhymeFest in the future...

Current Mood: tired
Saturday, April 29th, 2006
10:13 pm
One twenty four hour period, three journal entries? It's game time...
Well look at this. After a lengthy hiatus through most of the month of April, the cuse3421 LiveJournal is back to bring you all the latest in useless, sometimes thought-provoking, sometimes non-sensical banter. Unforunately for me, April has been a mess of business and procrastination with all of the deep, intellectual thought that comes at the end of a school year - reflecting on what is, what was, what could have been; that sort of stuff. With a WRT205 paper due in roughly 36hrs however, no real time to delve into my thoughts on that subject. Instead, I've got my normal platter of observation and analysis with a dash of sarcasm. Sounds like a meal to me, time to enjoy folks...

There is one thing I've really tried to improve on personally throughout the year. I've noticed that it's lacking in the general population as well. What's my goal entity? Why it's merely the ability to utilize plain, old straight-forward talk. Let me explain because I know it's not a clear idea (ok, yes that pun was intended). I think this concept is best expressed through an example, and unfortunately the only example I can think of is the common situation of boy and girl when one is interested and the other is not. A simple exchange in that situation might go like this:

"Hey, want to do something Saturday night?"
"Aww, I'd love to but I'm busy."

At first glance nothing big, right? However, often times I would argue there is definitely more than meets the eye to this exchange. Both parties involved could very well be utilizing innuendo instead of just coming forth with their real messages. Think what this situation would be like if it utilized straight-forward talk.

"Hey, I'm interested let's hang out."
"I don't feel the same just leave me alone."

Now I hear all the naysayers with their cries of "harsh" and "too blunt", but consider this. Put yourself in the situation of questioner number one. Would you rather sit analyzing and questioning why the other individual is always busy when you invite them out or would you rather know right up front and then just move on? For me personally, I really want to motivate myself into the straight-forward arena. I've been able to at times this year. If someone is interested I've said I don't feel the same. If someone asks me to come to an event, I say I won't be there instead of offerring a hopeless maybe. To me, it becomes a question of how much honesty do you want in your life. I understand innuendo prevents hurt feelings and denial in the short term, but in the long run it's important to have a clear outlook of your situations in life. I don't know, maybe I'm mumbling an argument for an all ready lost cause. In either case, I'm striving to be more honest with people. I know I slip and offer innuendos every now and then, but identifying that there's a problem is the first step, correct?...

Well, I'm burnt out. That's all he wrote for tonight loyal readers. I need to continue on with this actual writing specimen for WRT205 and unfortunately that means I have to cut back on the fun-blog for the evening. I'll come back with avengence (sp?) tomorrow with not one, but TWO posts - have to meet the quota after all. Until then, don't miss me too much. Enjoy the night, enjoy the weather, and most of all enjoy the music of Of Montreal...

Current Mood: blah
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